Program

Monday 26 July 2021

1130

First Nations Workshop Registration

Pullman Cairns International

1200 – 1630

Pre-Conference Workshop – First Nations Workshop

Better When We’re Together: First Nations Cultural Science, Western Science and Our Future Coasts Workshop

Co-Chaired by Phil Duncan and Kerrie Foxwell-Norton with Traditional Owners from Cairns, Yarrabah and Wujal Wujal

Cost: $60

For further information please click here.

 

1200

Future Earth Australia Workshop Registration

James Cook University, Bada-jali Campus, 36 Shields Street Cairns

1230 – 1630

Pre-Conference Workshop – Future Earth Australia

Future Earth Australia workshop on the implementation of the 10-year strategy for Ocean and Coastal Sustainability

Facilitated by Tayanah O’Donnell & Taryn Laubenstein, Future Earth Australia

Cost: Complimentary

For further information please click here. 

1600 – 1700

Coast to Coast Conference Registration

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns International 

1700 – 1900

Welcome Reception

The Welcome Reception is a fantastic opportunity to connect and re-connect with delegates and your industry peers.

Tuesday 27 July 2021

0800 – 1700

Registration

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns 

OPENING PLENARY SESSION

Mossman Room

0900 – 0910

Delegate Welcome & Housekeeping

Prof. Nick Harvey & Jo Ludbrook, Co-Convenors

0910 – 0945

Welcome to Country

Gudju Gudju Fourmile, Gimuy Walubara Yidinji Country

0945 – 1030

Keynote Presentation – Australian coastal compartments: past, present and future

Prof. Andrew Short, Honorary Professor, School of Geosciences, University of Sydney 

1030 – 1100

Morning Tea

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns International

PLENARY SESSION

Mossman Room

1100 – 1145

Keynote Presentation – Changing beliefs about the past and future of the Great Barrier Reef

Dr Charlie Veron, Researcher

1145 – 1230

Keynote Presentation – Reef Island Processes and Change in North Queensland and Torres Strait: Lessons for Management and Adaptation

A/Prof. Scott Smithers, Coastal Geomorphologist, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University

1230 – 1330

Lunch & Exhibition

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns International 

Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Session 1

Addressing the big issues in coastal communities

Kuranda Room

Concurrent Session 2

Reform in coastal policy and institutional frameworks 

Mossman Room

Concurrent Session 3

Coastal resilience and preparedness

Tully Room 1

Concurrent Session 4

Managing land and sea country together

Tully Room 2

Concurrent Session 5

Rainforest to Reef, catchment to coast

Tully Room 3

1330 – 1345

Mapping coral reefs from space for effective management and protection

Emily Twiggs

Implementation of the NSW Coastal Management Framework – surveying the practitioner’s experience in 2021

John Hudson

The tidal inlets of South East Queensland: morphology, manipulation and management

Prof. Rodger Tomlinson

Joint management in Gunaikurnai Country

Daniel Miller

Interactions between climate change, other change drivers and future high energy storm events in Queensland’s Wet Tropics: a ridge to reef perspective

Prof. Steve Turton

1345 – 1400

Marine plastic pollution impacts on Victoria’s parks

Mark Rodrigue

Implementing Victoria’s Marine and Coastal Policy by developing the first Marine and Coastal Strategy

Rebecca Price

Updated Guidelines for Storm Tide Flood Mapping

Michael Thomson

Mapping Makarda: A sea country collaboration between Anindilyakwa people and the Australian Institute of Marine Science

Katie Oxenham

Great Barrier Reef Regional Report Cards – why, how and the future

Diane Tarte

1400 – 1415

Litter and illegal dumping management framework

Bianca Gray

Integration, collaboration and adaptive management- the key to marine estate management in NSW

Tonia Clarkson

Determining beach volumetric change over decadal scales in Victoria using Structure-from-Motion and archival photography

Dr Rafael Carvalho

Traditional Owner stewardship of sea country is empowered through a science and management partnership on the Great Barrier Reef

Elizabeth Evans-Illidge & Traceylee Forester

Challenges and values based approach to restoring coastal wetlands in catchments draining to the Great Barrier Reef

Dr Nathan Waltham

1415 – 1430

Winners and losers in coastal policy reform – Victoria as a case study

Dr Geoff Wescott

DEA Coastlines: Mapping Australia’s dynamic coastline at mid-tide using three decades of satellite imagery

Robbi Bishop-Taylor

A new institutional framework to promote genuine reef research partnerships with Traditional Owners

Elizabeth Evans-Illidge

Roadside run-off in tropical Queensland tidal wetlands

Philip Jeston

1430 – 1450

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

1450 – 1520

Afternoon Tea

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns International

  Concurrent Sessions
 

Concurrent Session 6

Addressing the big issues in coastal communities

Kuranda Room

Concurrent Session 7

Reform in coastal policy and institutional frameworks 

Mossman Room

Concurrent Session 8

Coastal resilience and preparedness

Tully Room 1

Concurrent Session 9

Managing land and sea country together

Tully Room 2

Concurrent Session 10

Coastal Resilience and Preparedness

Tully Room 3

1520 – 1535

Addressing the (sea) elephant in the room: coastal climate resilience, commerce and communities – collaboration is key

A/Prof. Anthony Boxshall

What is valued? A critique of Australian coastal legislation, policies and plans

Dr Carmen Elrick-Barr

Managing the Coast is different in Victoria?

Gary McPike

Making Traditional Owner coastal values, goals and aspirations count: Sharing coastal hazard adaptation planning experiences from the Northern Peninsula Area, Cape York

Fiona Chandler & Marika Seden

Fitzroy Gully Erosion Control project

Linda Fahle

1535 – 1550

National reef building project: a bold plan to recover a critically endangered shellfish ecosystems

Craig Bohm

Victoria’s first marine spatial planning framework

Nicola Waldron

QCoast2100 – Delivering Queensland-wide adaptation planning for coastal hazards & sea level rise

Mat Cork & Sel Sultmann

Coastal management in the South West of WA

Jo Ludbrook

Wamberal Beach Coastal Erosion 2020 – Emergency response using innovative techniques that tested the NSW coastal management framework

Adrian Turnbull

1550 – 1605

Developing a national strategy for large scale coral reef restoration for coastal resilience in the Seychelles

Dr David Rissik

After 50 years will South Australia finally update its Coast Protection Act?

Mark Parnell

Managing and communicating coastal adaptation costs, benefits and trade-offs – A Noosa case study

Martijn Gough & Grant Hinner

Managing uncertainty when informing about swimming conditions downstream of urbanisation

Dr Ana Rubio

Implementation of Shoreline Erosion Management Plan at Amity Point: A Complex Challenge

Astrid Stuer

1605 – 1620

Financing coral reef restoration in Seychelles

Justin Story

Beliefs and political decision making in the workings of local government planning arenas

Rob Crosthwaite

Sustainable sediments for coastal resilience – can dredging be part of the solution?

Charlie Bicknell

Naval Base shacks WA: community working together to protect WA’s heritage

Mick Davis & Nicole O’Neill

A cloud-based GIS database to empower the Tweed Sand Bypassing project team and improve interactive community engagement

Linda Rijkenberg

1620 – 1640

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Wednesday 28 July 2021

0800 – 1700

Registration

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns 

PLENARY SESSION

Mossman Room

0900 – 0905

Welcome to Day 2

Prof. Nick Harvey & Jo Ludbrook, Co-Convenors

0905 – 0950

Keynote Presentation – Property Rights and managed retreat: exploring Coastal Lawscapes

Dr Tayanah O’Donnell, Director, Future Earth Australia, Australian Academy of Science

0950 – 1035

Keynote Presentation – Managed or Messy – perspectives on future coastal adaptation

Dorean Erhart, Director, Linden Climate Advisory, Brisbane, Queensland

1035 – 1100

Morning Tea

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns International

Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Session 11

Addressing the big issues in coastal communities

Kuranda Room

Concurrent Session 12

Reform in coastal policy and institutional frameworks 

Mossman Room

Concurrent Session 13

Coastal resilience and preparedness

Tully Room 1

Concurrent Session 14

Managing land and sea country together

Tully Room 2

Concurrent Session 15

Coastal Resilience and Preparedness

Tully Room 3

1100 – 1115

Blue Carbon co-benefit opportunities for shorebirds

Tony Flaherty

Cairns, a city at risk or opportunity?

Sophie Barrett

Adapting our planning to help us adapt

Phebe Bicknell

Integrated catchment and coastal management – the BCN model that works

Matt Crawly

Key Factors in early and late soft coastal landform responses to contemporary climate change-induced sea-level rise

Dr Chris Sharples

1115 – 1130

Share our shores campaign growth and challenges

Maddie Glynn

The making of expertise: identity and knowledge of the coastal professional

Naomi Edwards

Shaping Victoria’s adaptive and resilient coast, to 2100 and beyond

Dr Elisa Zavadil

Integration of community-derived marine debris data and oceanic modelling provides a real time perspective for targeted mitigation in waters of South Australia

Dr Kristian Peters

Reconstructing the dynamics of intermittent coastal inlets in Australia form publicly available satellite imagery: Early results from InletTracker, a new open-source Python toolkit

Dr Valentin Heimhuber

1130 – 1145

Debris Pathways from Source to Sea: The impact of land use and the Covid-19 pandemic on debris in stormwater networks

Brie Sherow

Policy for coastal issues in Australia: gaps in good practice

Dr Carmen Elrick-Barr & Prof. Tim Smith

Port Phillip Bay Coastal Hazard Assessment

Dr Tamara van Polanen Petel

Citizen scientists and machine learning to monitor coastal erosion with drones: a statewide approach

Nicolas Pucino

Waterway management through sub-catchment prioritisation studies in the Hornsby Shire LGA

Dr Ana Rubio

1145 – 1200

Uncensored Reflections on Twenty Five Years of Victorian Marine and Coastal Policy Reform

Dr Geoff Wescott

Summer seagrass wrack accumulations at Two Rocks, Western Australia – investigation and management pathways

Timothy Stead

1200 – 1220

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

1220 – 1230 Packed Lunch and Field Tours
 

Field Tours

Half day field tours are including in full conference registrations.  Coaches will depart from the Pullman Cairns International at 12.30pm and return in time for the conference dinner.

Field Tour 1 – Mangroves 
Join mangrove expert Hidetoshi Kudo (Mikey) for a tour showcasing the rich diversity of mangroves in Northern Queensland. Cairns has been known for the addition of two new mangroves to Australia: Haines Orange Mangrove (critically endangered under the EPBC act) and Dungarra Orange Mangrove (new to science). The tour will visit the sites for both species and also visit the new mangrove planting sites in Centenary Lakes. Mikey who discovered the new mangroves will talk about the story of discovery and how the planting has been carried out.

Field Tour 2 – Coastal Geomorphology
The Cairns region is characterised by a coastal plain composed of Late Quaternary alluvial sediments abutting marine / estuarine sediments. The latter comprises a hard yellow-grey clay of probable Pleistocene age overlying bedrock. A Holocene soft blue-grey clay unit, generally 3 – 7 m thick, but in places extending to more than 20 m thickness, overlies the yellow clay. Medium to coarse-grained sand beach ridges overlies the Holocene clay unit.
The beaches of the region have developed within a low wave energy climate dominated by south-easterly trade winds. Occasional tropical cyclones occur generating waves offshore up to 5 m along with storm tide inundations up to 2 m above AHD. Elsewhere, near Cairns, storm inundations have exceeded 7 m AHD historically and on Cape York Peninsula a 13 m storm inundation occurred in 1899. This latter event is the highest storm inundation known globally according to the World Meteorological Organisation.
This field trip will examine the coast of Cairns from Trinity Bay, bordering Cairns esplanade, to the northern beaches. We will discuss the characteristics of the embayments, beaches and beach ridge deposits, and sediment transport along the coast. Areas of coastal erosion and approaches to help remedy this problem will also be examined. The historical development of parts of the coast, and in particular changes in the position of coastal streams, will also be discussed. Stream avulsion has had an impact on sediment supply to sections of the coast and also on the encroachment of mangroves especially close to the airport and along the Cairns esplanade foreshore. These stream movements also have bearing on native title issues. The role of tropical cyclones in influencing coastal sediment transport and the development of beach ridge plains will also be discussed.

Field Tour 3 – Local Government and Coastal Management
This trip will focus on contemporary examples of coastal management that have been implemented in Cairns. These include rock walls, sand nourishment, groynes, and erosion on the Cairns Northern Beaches (Machans Beach, Holloways, and Yorkey’s Knob). We will discuss some of the challenges and opportunities these present, and also the role that nature-based solutions or hybrid solutions can offer. We will also talk to the Tropical Urban Design Lab at James Cook University about how these options interact with our foreshores and enhance amenity, including the potential for integrating nature-based options into traditionally hard engineered options. Finally, we will look at the outcomes of the Cairns Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy and Councils long-term planning from now until 2100 to address sea-level rise, erosion, and storm tide inundation and the changes expected over time and how these will be considered at these localities.

Field Tour 4 – Jaragun NRM – Russell River Catchment
Delegates will be welcomed to Wanjuru-Yidinjii country through a traditional welcome from the Wanjuru dance troupe at Babinda Boulders, an iconic tourist destination in the Russell River catchment, North Queensland. Delegates will visit an important location within the landscape, where water quality improvement strategies are being undertaken to restore ecosystem function within a modified hydrological system. Delegates will receive an introduction to how the Electromagnetic Induction survey is being used to develop detailed soil maps that support precision farm nutrient management for improved water quality to the Great Barrier Reef.

 

 

1900 – 2300

Coast to Coast Conference Dinner

Grand Ballroom, Pullman Cairns International

Conference Dinner Presentation – Women of the Great Barrier Reef
Kerrie Foxwell-Norton will speak on the inspiring Women of the Great Barrier Reef and how their stories will create a collection that will serve the John Oxley Library and its community for years to come.  From naturalists and scientists, to activists, artists and authors, politicians, and bureaucrats, to First Nations and reef communities, the Women of the Reef project will produce powerful stories about women as role models of environmental leadership and authority.

Thursday 29 July 2021

0800 – 1700

Registration

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns 

PLENARY SESSION

Mossman Room

0845 – 0850

Welcome to Day 3

Prof. Nick Harvey & Jo Ludbrook, Co-Convenors

0850 – 0935 Keynote Presentation – The changing prominence of coastal NRM in Australia
A/Prof. Beverley Clarke, College of Humanities, Art and Social Sciences, Flinders University of South Australia 
0935 – 0955

Plenary talks

National Coastal adaptation Agenda 2010 – 2020
Prof. Bruce Thom 

Sustainable Oceans and Coasts: Consultation for a ten-year strategy
Dr Taryn Laubenstein

0955 – 1015 Q & A Panel Session on Australian Coasts – Looking to the future
1045 – 1115

Morning Tea

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns International

Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Session 16

Addressing the big issues in coastal communities

Kuranda Room

Concurrent Session 17

Reform in coastal policy and institutional frameworks 

Mossman Room

Concurrent Session 18

Coastal resilience and preparedness

Tully Room 1

Concurrent Session 19

Managing land and sea country together

Tully Room 2

Concurrent Session 20

Coastal Resilience and Preparedness

Tully Room 3

1115 – 1130

Engineering the future: Coastal wetlands

Toby Tucker

CoastKit – Victoria’s first marine and coastal knowledge management system

Dr Tessa Mazor & Rhiannon Holden

Estimating anthropogenic debris risk across the NSW Marine Estate

Jordan Gacuten

 

Future Earth Coasts (FEC) Global Assessment Initiative

A/Prof. Kai Schulz

 

Coastal resilience paradigms and priorities for the Australia’s east coast

Dr Marcello Sano

1130 – 1145

Australia’s integrated marine observing system in 2020 – planning for impact

Dr Indi Hodgson-Johnston

Monitoring for Management

Dr Warwick Noble

An impact-based approach to assessing climate change’s role in changing coastal inundation risk

Ben Hague

Urchins on the Move

Mark Rodrigue

Rapid coastal adaptation pathways planning using probabilistic, outcome-centric methodology at two sites in NSW

Christian Taylor 

1145 – 1200

Characterising climate resilience in coastal groundwater-dependent ecosystems

Madeleine Dyring

Remote islands and long-term coastal adaptation pathways

James Lewis

Camping ground, battleground or just losing ground for coastal adaptation to climate change

Anne Leitch

Source reduction of professional fishing debris

Simon Rowe

Community-led coastal dieback management in Western Australia: Regional NRM groups creating innovative solutions that match and complement government and universities

Mia Hunt

1200 – 1215

Coastal Geoscience and Engineering in Australia: Research Priorities and Emerging Issues

A/Prof. Hannah Power

The science vs action investment gap in coastal climate adaptation – how can coastal climate action get the dollars and expertise needed?

Jacquie White & Jeska Dee

Swimming and surfing for healthy coasts: Vulnerability, encounter, and making kin through ocean sports

Dr Rebecca Olive

Tide to Tip – An oyster industry waterway clean-up initiative

Siobhan Threfall

The Victorian Coastal Monitoring Program multi-method historical shoreline analysis of Port Phillip Bay

Dr Jak McCarroll

1215 – 1230

Questions, including live Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live Q & A for online delegates

 

1230 – 1330

Lunch

Ballroom Foyer, Pullman Cairns International


Australian Coastal Society Annual General Meeting

Kuranda Room, lunch will be available at the beginning of  the lunch break, please grab some lunch and then make your way into the room for the AGM.

  Concurrent Sessions
 

Concurrent Session 21

Addressing the big issues in coastal communities

Kuranda Room

Concurrent Session 22

Reform in coastal policy and institutional frameworks 

Mossman Room

Concurrent Session 23

Coastal resilience and preparedness

Tully Room 1

Concurrent Session 24

Managing land and sea country together

Tully Room 2

Concurrent Session 25

Coastal resilience and preparedness

Tully Room 3

1330 – 1345

Coastal adaptation or social adaptation? Creating a legacy beyond the coastal plan

Fiona Chandler

Washpool Lagoon – juggling coastal restoration and community expectations

Tony Flaherty & Damian Moroney

Low tide during lock-down: a critical ethnography of beach usage during COVID-19

Elissa Ashton-Smith

A scientific update on the Victorian Coastal Monitoring Program (VCMP)

Rafael Carvalho

The Cape to Cape Resilience Project – living with our changing coast

Cassandra Philippou

1345 – 1400

Coastal Management Decision Support Framework, Case Study – Yorke Peninsula

Annabel Sandery

#SeaToSource – tackling one of the world’s most solvable environmental issues

Renae Riviere

 

CoastSnap: a global citizen science project to monitor changing coastlines

Dr Mitchell Harley

Barwon Estuary project: a community education approach to stewardship

Jon Duthie

Application of Geoscience Australia’s national DEA Coastlines product; a geomorphic overview

Dr Rachel Nanson

1400 – 1415

Assessing long-term changes in shoreline position using multi-decadal remote sensing datasets in Queensland (Australia)

Dylan Cowley

The Ecology of ALAN (Let there be light, but not too much and definitely not blue …)

Dr John Thorogood

Coastal Adaptation Planning for the City of Greater Geraldton

Jim Churchill

Applying the best of leadership theory and practice to integrated coastal zone management (ICZM)

Chris Rees

Long term coastal datasets – What else have we been measuring?

John Ryan

1415 – 1430

Lessons from the dismal science (economics)

Steve Charlton-Henderson

The Think Line – A Behaviour Change Safety Campaign to address rip current drowning

Shane Daw 

 

Investigating dredge placement optimisation to benefit surf amenity

Dr Alexander Atkinson

Sharing the love for Victoria’s marine protected areas

Mark Rodrigue

Implementation of climate change adaptation pilot projects in the Indo-Pacific

Dan Rodger

1430 – 1445

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Questions, including live

Q & A for online delegates

 

Closing Plenary Session

Mossman Room

1445 – 1515

Conference summary and closing remarks

Prof. Nick Harvey & Jo Ludbrook, Co-Convenors

Friday 30 July 2021

0800 – 1730

Wet Tropics Coastal Field Tour

  • Date: Friday 30 July 2021
  • Time: 8:00am – 5:30pm
  • Cost: $50pp (attendees will also need to purchase their own lunch)
  • What to bring: Change of clothes, covered shoes/walking boots, umbrellas, bug spray, sunscreen, hats, money (for lunch, coffee etc).
Please note the minimum number for the tour to go ahead is 10 people and will be capped at 20 people.  Please contact liz@conferencedesign.com.au to reserve your spot on this tour.

The Wet Tropics is one of six NRM regions in the Great Barrier Reef catchment and it is a particular hotspot for nutrient, pesticide and sediment runoff for several unique reasons: 1) Nine river basins, 2) highly variable rainfall and river flows, 3) close proximity of reef to coastline, and 4 intensive agriculture. This field trip will be hosted by the Wet Tropics Waterways Partnership, an initiative of the Reef 2020 Long Term Sustainability Plan. Its main purpose is to monitor waterway health across the region from a ridge-to-reef perspective, and to bring the community together to raise awareness, share ideas, and jointly work together to enhance our waterways.

Highlights will include visits to the Major Integrated Project bioreactor and demonstration sites in the Tully Catchment, an artificial wetland on a cane drain in the Johnstone Catchment, a coastal restoration project at Mission Beach (a cassowary hotspot), other examples of catchment repair and initiatives to restore terrestrial and aquatic connectivity in the landscape.

Various tour operators have offered Coast to Coast delegates discounts on their tours.  For further information and to book please CLICK HERE